How Paris Became Paris: The Urban Development of the City of Lights

Member news | February 04, 2019

In October, members were invited to attend a lecture series by Dr. Elizabeth New Seitz of French Affaires, LLC, held at the SMU main campus in Dallas Texas.

Paris continues to be the most visited city in the world. This iconic metropolis fascinates everyone from first-time visitors to regulars to residents and begs the question - how did Paris become Paris? While some people are familiar with the modernization of the city that took place during the 19th century, many are unaware that Paris's modern urban development actually began much earlier with the efforts of such kings as Henry IV and Louis XIV. Based on research and insights from primary sources, this course will explore the various facets of Paris's 17th century remaking through illustrated lecture and lively discussion, and you will gain a whole new understanding of Paris plus plenty of travel ideas for your next trip to the French capital.

About the speaker:

Elizabeth New Seitz, Ph.D.

A native Texan, Dr. Elizabeth New Seitz is a noted expert in French language and culture. She is the founder of French Affaires, a unique company celebrating French travel, culture, language and l’art de vivre. She received her B.A., M.A. & Ph.D. in French from Vanderbilt University and studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and with Vanderbilt-in-France in Aix-en-Provence. She has lived, worked and traveled extensively in France since 1983. A former university French professor, her specialty is making France wonderfully personal and accessible to everyone through her one-of-a-kind France journeys; custom France trip design; and French events, classes and lectures. She still loves to teach the French language and is often asked to speak about French culture to groups across the U.S. Elizabeth, her husband and their French dog Marcel divide their time between the U.S. and their house in Courances, France. She is currently writing two books on France.

https://frenchaffaires.com